Episode Information

The state of AIDS in Connecticut
Where We Live - with John Dankosky
Aired:
11/30/2007
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In this episode:

Tomorrow is World AIDS Day, and we're spending today's show talking about the disease.

 

Episode Audio

53:30 minutes (25.69 MB)
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The very first line of the new book by writer Tina Brown says a lot about the state of AIDS in America. It reads: "AIDS didn't become important to me until somebody I knew died."

The AIDS/HIV epidemic that has claimed so many lives since the 1980s has claimed few headlines in recent years, in part because so many more people are able to live with the disease. Better antiretroviral drugs and treatment plans have made it possible for those affected, at least in the developed world, to survive and thrive.

But some of the numbers are still shocking, especially in our small state. Connecticut is eighth in the nation in AIDS cases per capita. It's the leading state for injection drug users, second in cases among women, and third among latinos. Today, we'll be talking more about these numbers and the trends nationally and globally.

But the story of AIDS is more than just numbers. It's embodied in the people who have lived with and died from it. People like Linda Jordan, an AIDS activist who died in 2006 after a hard life in the streets of Hartford, and underwent a reawakening as a crusader against the disease.

The Hartford Courant's Tina Brown has written a new book about Linda Jordan's life, called "Crooked Road Straight." It's a comprehensive look at what led her to drugs and AIDS,and how she changed so many lives by telling her story. We'll also be joined by John Merz, the executive director of the Connecticut AIDS Resource Coalition to talk about the current state of funding and awareness.

For events related to World AIDS Day, visit the Institute for Community Research website.

For pictures of Where We Live guests, please visit our Flickr page.

If you have questions or comments for us, send us an email at wherewelive@wnpr.org.

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