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2nd District Challenger Sean Sullivan
Where We Live - with John Dankosky
Aired:
04/15/2008
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In this episode:

Republican Sean Sullivan is the latest to get into the 2nd District political ring.

 

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51:59 minutes (24.95 MB)
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2nd District Congressional Candidate, Sean Sullivan: Photo by George Goodrich2nd District Congressional Candidate, Sean Sullivan: Photo by George GoodrichConnecticut's 2nd District provided the closest house race in the nation in 2006 - so what's in store for this November?

The win by Joe Courtney over incumbent Rob Simmons follows a pattern of tight elections in Connecticut's biggest geographic district, and one of it's most diverse. The 2nd district includes the state's largest agricultural area, most of it's military/industrial infrastructure, a large state university, and two of the largest casinos in the world. Cities like Norwich are rapidly changing, with an influx of immigrants from all over the world.

Republican Sean Sullivan is the latest to get into this unusual political ring. The Navy veteran retired in 2006 as the Base Commanding Officer in Groton. He's now a lawyer in Norwich - and is running against the freshman Courtney for his seat.

Like we did in 2006, we're giving the incumbents of the state's five districts, and their challengers, time to answer your questions and outline their visions for their districts, and the nation.

To see pictures of Where We Live's in-studio guests, please go to our Flickr page.

You can contact us via email at wherewelive@wnpr.org.

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This was an interesting interview. It is remarkable the Republican party can put forward such a clueless candidate. There was no better example of such a closed minded, ignorant, attitude than his reply to the remarks from the caller, referring to the success of Finland, asking why we are so opposed to paying higher taxes. He said America invented the car, TV, computers, and all the good drugs, because, of course, our taxes are low. Only problem there is, America did NOT invent the car, TV, the computer, or ALL the good drugs. The astonishment of his ignorant and jingoistic reply was only exceeded by your lack of calling him on his ridiculous assumptions. You may have had a limited amount of time, and perhaps questioning his views was not part of the outline, but it was clear that he was well prepared for his own mealy-mouthed talking points, but when presented with a, very valid, issue concerning our country's position within the Western World, and why we are unable to adapt some of the programs that have proven successful in other Western Countries, he revealed himself as another backwards hick, promoting the Ugly-American Stereotype (yes, I've read the book and understand the true reference, but am using the reference in its' "popular' meaning).
And you let him off the hook.
You should have called him on it.

Thank you.

A. Remick