Episode Information

Reforming Secondary Education
Where We Live - with John Dankosky
Aired:
06/06/2008
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How would you change high school?

 

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52:00 minutes (24.96 MB)
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Mark McQuillan, Commissioner of Connecticut’s State Department of Education: Photo by Chion WolfMark McQuillan, Commissioner of Connecticut’s State Department of Education: Photo by Chion WolfConnecticut has proposed a series of reforms to redesign the High School system. How will these changes work to prepare students for their next steps in life?

The reforms include more credits to graduate, a tougher core curriculum, end of year testing, and a senior thesis project.

The changes are meant to create a framework that will better prepare students all the way from Pre-Kindergarten through college.

Cal Heminway, President of CABE: Photo By Chion WolfCal Heminway, President of CABE: Photo By Chion Wolf But, in a world where state and federal mandates already have many school systems overburdened, can this type of high school reform work?

Today, where we live, we'll discuss the proposed changes with Mark McQuillan and George Coleman of the state Department of Education, and Cal Heminway from the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education.

George Coleman, Deputy Commissioner of Connecticut’s State Department of Education: Photo by Chion WolfGeorge Coleman, Deputy Commissioner of Connecticut’s State Department of Education: Photo by Chion Wolf
And, we'd like you to join the conversation. What do you think of proposed changes to the way high school works? How can Connecticut schools prepare students for the future?

If you have questions or comments for us, send us an email at [email protected].

For a slideshow of pictures from Where We Live, visit WNPR Images on Flickr.com.

Join the conversation! Add your suggestions, questions and comments below!


 
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After all the discussions about public schools, I am totally surprised that you still miss the point. Have you ever wondered why teachers do not tell you anything except that everything is rosy and working just fine? Ever wonder why teachers do not call in to your show? You need to understand that the reason why teachers are not part of your discussion is that it is specifically written into their contracts that they are to never do anything to embarrass the board of education. This means “Speak out against the policies or rituals of the school and get fired.” Also, what you will quickly realize is that it is not a question of whether a teacher is “well qualified” or not but rather a question as to why these teachers don’t stay. There is always a lot of discussion about testing teachers. When will testing of the administrators and staff be discussed? We need to question the qualifications of everyone above the teachers. Here is where the problems are…

I once worked for a school system and questioned why a certain person was in charge of student discipline. It turned out that he was previously a science teacher. When students entered his class room, they would flip his tie and pick the pens out of his pocket and toss them. His classes were never organized or productive. He became the captain of the HMS Pinafore and all he did was polish the handle on the big front door.

While you are at it, you need to question how the board of ed. is staffed and discuss their qualifications since they determine who gets hired..

Gary Sutcliff