Culture Connect Featured Event

The Japanese Barberry: Controlling An Ecosystem Disaster
Ticket Price: Advance registration required: $10 ($5 for Museum members)
For Tickets, Contact: Venue
Thomas Worthley, Cooperative Extension System, UConn

The Japanese Barberry: Controlling An Ecosystem Disaster


Thomas Worthley, Cooperative Extension System, UConn

Saturday, May 19th,  10 a.m.- 12 Noon.


Storrs, CT (directions will be sent to participants)


Advance registration required: $10 ($5 for Museum members)


Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Arriving in the United States from Japan in 1875, the attractive Japanese barberry flourished as a popular ornamental plant due to its low maintenance care and deer-resistance.

However, over time it began to spread into the wild, pushing out native plants and creating an ideal environment in which earthworms, ticks, and mice could thrive.

This interconnected relationship between the different species has ultimately created some unhealthy forest ecosystems affecting soil and water quality, growing space for native wildflowers and tree seedlings, and increasing the risk of exposure to Lyme disease.

During this program explore the complex relationships between the different species connected to the Japanese barberry, and the impact these relationships have on the ecosystem they are part of.

Then learn techniques for an integrated program of invasive plant control in forest understories, including treatment techniques (flame weeding, mechanical control, and herbicide application), site evaluation, time estimations for treatments, and field safety. There will be a hands-on demonstration of techniques and equipment.

Presented by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UConn. 860.486.4460 - www.mnh.uconn.edu