Wednesday, February 5 2014

Format: 2014/04/19

Wednesday, February 5 2014

Greasy Luck! The Whaling World of the Charles W. Morgan

In celebration of the relaunching of the last surviving wooden whaleship, Lyman Allyn presents Greasy Luck! The Whaling World of the Charles W. Morgan.

The exhibition, which runs from September 21 through June 8, 2014, will look at how whaling—its myths and reality, risk and reward—left its mark on Connecticut and American identity.

In the 1800s, friends and family gathered on the docks to wish “greasy luck” for a successful voyage to departing whaleships.

 

To most people, whales were mysterious creatures.  Yet whaling was big business.

 

The thousands of barrels of oil the whalers brought home made ports like New London and Mystic some of the wealthiest places in the young nation, supporting a wide array of dockside occupations.

 

Fairfield Back & Forth: Imagery by artist Miggs Burroughs

Visitors will be mesmerized by images that transform from 19th century photos to present-day scenes in Westport artist’s Miggs Burroughs new lenticular photography show.

The exhibition will be on view through February 18, 2014.

 

 

Wesleyan Potters presents: Hartford Art School - “Dirty For A Reason”

Opening reception, Friday, February 7th 6 pm – 7:30 pm. Wesleyan Potters Gallery/Shop is featuring a show by University of Hartford ceramics faculty and majors. Contemporary issues in clay, both functional and sculptural, are addressed in their innovative work, which will be on exhibit and for sale during regular gallery hours. Wesleyan Potters Gallery/Shop, 350 S. Main St. Route 17, Middletown, CT, Gallery hours: Wed -Fri 10 am - 6 pm, Sat 10-4 and Sunday Noon-4, 860-344-0039 www.wesleyanpotters.com

 

PERRY OBEE, “STACKED SPACE”

Perry Obee’s painting process is driven by the formal and material concerns of direct studio practice. As explorations of the abstract, representational and material properties of paint the underling content of his work is the situational context of everyday objects, people and place. In the “Stacked Space” series, precarious vertical and horizontal stacks of books and other objects appear to dissolve into shallow background planes. Modern still-life traditions are engaged here as composition; lighting and color are manipulated to derive a sense of self-referential order and harmony. These arranged views of Obee’s possessions double as autobiographical interactions of momentary space, artistic perspective and the material experience of his own place within them.

Obee is an adjunct art instructor at MxCC. He holds an MFA from Western Connecticut State University and a BFA from Ohio Wesleyan University. See more of his work at perryobee.carbonmade.com. Pegasus Gallery is located within the library on the first floor of Chapman Hall. Hours: Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., when classes are in session.

 

KAREN BARTONE, “TONDO ART: AN INTIMATE EXHIBITION OF MINIATURE PAINTINGS

Attend a reception on Wednesday February 5, 2014 from 5 to 7 p.m. and enjoy Karen Barton’s series of tondo paintings, which employ the traditional round panel format and the Italian Renaissance combination of oil paint and gold leaf. Picturesque subjects of reflected water lilies, trees, sky and rippled water dislocate viewer’s sense of specificity as they are composed within closely cropped peephole perspectives. The small scale and circular shapes here similarly reference telescopic and magnified slide compositions in as much as the direct landscapes they represent. Bartone lives in Clinton, Connecticut, and holds an MFA from Western Connecticut State University and a BFA from the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. See more of her work at karenbartone.com. The Niche is located in Founders Hall across from the Registrar’s Office. Hours: Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to  4 p.m.

 

Lend Me A Tenor at Playhouse on Park

The Main Stage season at Playhouse on Park resumes with Lend Me A Tenor, a madcap tale of one unforgettable evening at a Cleveland opera house in 1934. When Tito Morelli, the scheduled star tenor, is unexpectedly sidelined, the manager of the theatre, Saunders, pushes his assistant into the spotlight to replace him. What follows is a hilarious case of mistaken identity. In what The London Times calls “a remarkable piece of theatre”, Lend Me A Tenor is sure to leave audiences belting out with laughter.

Leading the cast are Mike Boland as Saunders and Robert Wilde as Tito Morelli. Mr. Boland’s previous shows include Broadway’s Enemy of the People, the national tours of West Side Story and Twelve Angry Men, Hartford Stage’s To Kill A Mockingbird and Orphans Home Cycle, Theaterworks’ Exonerated, and Long Wharf’s She Stoops to Conquer, Wit, Mystery School, and A Question of Mercy. Mr. Wilde previously performed as the title roles of Ivoryton Playhouse’s Jekyll and Hyde and Che in River Valley Repertory’s Evita, and has also appeared in the hit film The Dark Knight. Also in the role of Maria Morelli is Ashley Ford, who returns after her successful run in Playhouse on Park’s Cabaret. Completing the cast are Jeff Gonzalez (Max), Lilly Wilton (Maggie), Donna Schilke (Julia), Katie Vincent (Diana), and Corrado Alicata (Bellhop).

Lend Me A Tenor runs January 22 through February 9, 2014. For information on days, times and tickets, visit www.playhouseonpark.org, or call 860-523-5900 x10. You can also find more information on wine and cheese receptions, talk-backs with the cast, and 4-pack subscriptions for the rest of the Main Stage season.


 

 

“Thingamabob” Exhibit at Maritime Garage Gallery

Machines, gadgets and all things technology inspire the artwork at a new exhibit at the Maritime Garage Gallery. “Thingamabob” features art that is in the eye of the mechanically inclined in a group show of artists, including John Jackson of Jefferson, New York, Tom Hlas of Norfolk, CT, Lewis Schaffer from Ridgefield, Deborah Rauh from Westport, Sara Roche from Weston, and others.  

The Maritime Garage Gallery, located at 11 North Water Street, is part of the Norwalk Parking Authority’s “Art in Parking Places” initiative, an effort to support art in public spaces making Norwalk a more vibrant destination. The gallery is free and open to the public from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

 

Opening Reception for "Mary Heebner: Silent Faces/Angkor"

 In the multi dimensional installation “Silent Faces/Angkor,” Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. Ms. Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth.

When she went to Cambodia's Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called “geography of a face” to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat's 12th-century frieze, the “Churning of the Sea of Milk,” and the other sculptural works there. While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth.

The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation. Ms. Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, The British Library, the New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library, Dartmouth College, the University of California, and Stanford University. A luncheon buffet will be served following the opening and gallery talk by Curator Patrick Dowdey.

Reception at Noon. 

 

Artist Talk by Evan Roth

  Evan Roth’s work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology.

The powerful and surprising images, objects, and experiences in the exhibition “Intellectual Property Donor” suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Roth consistently intervenes into existing systems to subvert or transform them from the private realm to the public. His interest in graffiti and open source programming fall under the rubric of hacking.

He often mentions a “handshake” moment between graffiti writers and hackers, noting the inherent potential to reach wider audiences and spread his way of thinking into general popular culture by referencing the same systems and open source methodologies.

Roth inventively takes his artist's brain and reaches into the disparate worlds of computer programming and street culture, forging a new way to approach each realm. Based in Paris, he received his M.F.A. from the Parsons New School for Design; and co-founded the Graffiti Research Lab in 2005, and the Free Art and Technology Lab, an arts and free culture collective, in 2007.

This exhibition is the largest one-person presentation of the artist's pioneering, multi-faceted work in the United States. Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History.

 

Opening Reception for Evan Roth's "Intellectual Property Donor"

  Evan Roth’s work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology.

The powerful and surprising images, objects, and experiences in the exhibition “Intellectual Property Donor” suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections.

Roth consistently intervenes into existing systems to subvert or transform them from the private realm to the public. His interest in graffiti and open source programming fall under the rubric of hacking. He often mentions a “handshake” moment between graffiti writers and hackers, noting the inherent potential to reach wider audiences and spread his way of thinking into general popular culture by referencing the same systems and open source methodologies.

Roth inventively takes his artist's brain and reaches into the disparate worlds of computer programming and street culture, forging a new way to approach each realm.

Based in Paris, he received his M.F.A. from the Parsons New School for Design; and co-founded the Graffiti Research Lab in 2005, and the Free Art and Technology Lab, an arts and free culture collective, in 2007.

This exhibition is the largest one-person presentation of the artist's pioneering, multi-faceted work in the United States. Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History.

 

"Evan Roth//Intellectual Property Donor"

Evan Roth's work occupies the irregular zone at the intersection of free culture with popular culture, where viral media meets art, and graffiti connects with technology.

The powerful and surprising images, objects, and experiences in the exhibition “Intellectual Property Donor” suggest a new way to exist within the current environment shaped by our participation in an increasingly cyber and global world, yet grounded in our need for materiality and personal connections. Roth consistently intervenes into existing systems to subvert or transform them from the private realm to the public.

His interest in graffiti and open source programming fall under the rubric of hacking. He often mentions a "handshake" moment between graffiti writers and hackers, noting the inherent potential to reach wider audiences and spread his way of thinking into general popular culture by referencing the same systems and open source methodologies.

Roth inventively takes his artist's brain and reaches into the disparate worlds of computer programming and street culture, forging a new way to approach each realm. Based in Paris, he received his M.F.A. from the Parsons New School for Design; and co-founded the Graffiti Research Lab in 2005, and the Free Art and Technology Lab, an arts and free culture collective, in 2007.

This exhibition is the largest one-person presentation of the artist's pioneering, multi-faceted work in the United States. Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History.

 

"Mary Heebner: Silent Faces/Angkor"

 In the multi dimensional installation “Silent Faces/Angkor,” Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. Ms. Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth.

When she went to Cambodia's Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called “geography of a face” to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat's 12th-century frieze, the “Churning of the Sea of Milk,” and the other sculptural works there.

While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth. The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation. Ms. Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, The British Library, the New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library, Dartmouth College, the University of California, and Stanford University.

Exhibit hours Tuesday-Sunday, Noon-4pm

Closed Saturday, March 15 through Monday, March 24, 2014