Sunday, February 2 2014

Format: 2014/08/23

Sunday, February 2 2014

Greasy Luck! The Whaling World of the Charles W. Morgan

In celebration of the relaunching of the last surviving wooden whaleship, Lyman Allyn presents Greasy Luck! The Whaling World of the Charles W. Morgan.

The exhibition, which runs from September 21 through June 8, 2014, will look at how whaling—its myths and reality, risk and reward—left its mark on Connecticut and American identity.

In the 1800s, friends and family gathered on the docks to wish “greasy luck” for a successful voyage to departing whaleships.

 

To most people, whales were mysterious creatures.  Yet whaling was big business.

 

The thousands of barrels of oil the whalers brought home made ports like New London and Mystic some of the wealthiest places in the young nation, supporting a wide array of dockside occupations.

 

War Horse

A magnificent piece of theatre described by The London Times as “…so exhilarating that it makes you rejoice to be alive… Its sheer skill and invention are simply awe-inspiring.”
 

War Horse is a powerful and imaginative drama set at the outbreak of World War I in the English countryside and also the fields of battle in France and Germany. War Horse tells the story of young Albert’s beloved horse, Joey, which has been sold to the cavalry and shipped to France. In a tale that the Sunday Express said is “…both epic and intimate,” and “absolutely guaranteed to move the heart,” Joey is caught in enemy crossfire and ends up serving both sides of the war before landing in no man’s land. Albert, not old enough to enlist, embarks on treacherous mission to find his horse and bring him home. What follows is a remarkable tale of courage, loyalty and friendship.
 

War Horse is filled with stirring music and songs, and at the heart of the show are life-sized puppets which bring breathing, galloping, charging horses to life on stage. “The puppetry is nothing short of miraculous,” according to The Times of London.

 

Fairfield Back & Forth: Imagery by artist Miggs Burroughs

Visitors will be mesmerized by images that transform from 19th century photos to present-day scenes in Westport artist’s Miggs Burroughs new lenticular photography show.

The exhibition will be on view through February 18, 2014.