Wednesday, September 18 2013

Format: 2014/07/30

Wednesday, September 18 2013

Greenleaf Pottery: Classes in Wheel Thrown Pottery

Classes offer firsthand experience of the entire pottery-making cycle. Beginning emphasis is placed on working with one of the fifteen potter's wheels.  Beginning as well as advanced students are welcome. Sets of eight week classes are offered Tuesday or Thursday evening 6 to 9 p.m.,  year-round. Sign up now to reserve your place.

Call or go to the website for more information. 860-528-6090, www.greenleafpottery.net

 

Discover 19th Century Inventions at New Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum Exhibit

      Victorian era gadgets, technologies and breakthroughs will be on display at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum beginning April 17th through October 6, 2013. What Is It? Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era will engage student and adult audiences in the exploration of mid-to-late 19th century inventions and discoveries in many diverse areas including communication, transportation, manufacturing, medicine, food and recreation.

       Visitors will view cutting-edge Victorian Era technology that were precursors of some of today’s technologies, including telegraphs, dictaphones, gas lighting and early examples of telephones, burglar alarms, stock tickers and much more. They will discover items we still see today, from board games to food such as condensed milk and breakfast cocoa. Artifacts on display include loans from Connecticut's Mattatuck Museum and the Museum of American Finance, New York City, among others.

             The What Is It? exhibit is curated by Raechel Guest. Guest is a Smith College graduate with a Master’s Degree in Collection Management from the prestigious Winterthur Museum. Professor Steven Lubar, a history of technology expert, serves as a special advisor.  Professor Lubar is Professor of the Departments of American Studies, History, and History of Art and Architecture at Brown University.  

            The exhibit is made possible thanks to a grant from the Connecticut Humanities (CTH), a non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds, creates and collaborates on hundreds of cultural programs across Connecticut each year. CTH brings together people of all ages and backgrounds to express, share and explore ideas in thoughtful and productive ways. From local discussion groups to major exhibitions on important historical events, CTH programs engage, enlighten and educate.  Learn more by visiting www.cthumanities.org.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the LMMM Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.  The Museum’s Education Program is made possible in part by a generous donation from AT&T.

Tours for the museum and exhibit are offered Wednesdays through Sundays, 
at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.

 

 

Conversations: A Community Forum

 Eric Deggans, author of Race-baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation will kick off the “Conversations: A Community Forum” series. The series is hosted by the Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society and will focus on a timely topic two times per year. This event will take place at the Playhouse on Park (244 Park Rd, West Hartford) on Wednesday, September 18 at 7 p.m.  

Deggans, a journalist with the Tampa Bay Times, recently published Race-baiter as a response to Bill O'Reilly of "The O'Reilly Factor" who called him, "one of the biggest race-baiters in the country."  Deggans has appeared on CNN, CBS, NPR, and many other national television and radio stations and shows.

Deggans will share the background of and stories from his book, and open the floor to questions and discussion about the topic at hand. A panel of distinguished local media members will make up the panel.

Reservations are suggested and can be made at www.NoahWebsterHouse.org. Advance tickets are $10 per person and $5 for museum members. Friends of the Forum tickets can be purchased for $50 and includes a meet and greet with the speakers, along with hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

Visit www.NoahWebsterHouse.org for tickets and information.

 

Christine Aaron: “Liminal States: Beneath the Surface”

This exhibit of rich mixed media nature based work, focuses on themes of memory, loss and the passage of time.  Trees serve as a metaphor for the cycle of life; symbols of dormancy, growth, strength and renewal.  

 

 

Amy Bilden: “Inheritance”

The themes for this exhibit revolve around domesticity, including topics such as identity, sexuality, gender and care giving.  The tactile domestic inspired sculptures map the artist’s emotional and physical space, using a monotonous process in which she connects her internal and external landscapes.

 

 

Kool-Aid Wino, new exhibition at Franklin Street Works curated by Claire Barliant

 Franklin Street Works is proud to present Kool-Aid Wino, a group exhibition curated by Brooklyn-based writer and critic Claire Barliant. The exhibition explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani made in the early twenties.  It is on view at Franklin Street Works from July 20 – September 22 with a free, public reception on July 20 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. There will be a performance by Aki Sasamoto during the reception, beginning at 7:00 pm.

The show starts with the widely accepted premise that artistic process relies on trial and error. You try something, you mess up, you move on. But what if you stay with that mistake, or that troubling passage, and make it the focus? What if you let it be awkward, an irritant, wiggle it like a loose tooth or pick at it like a scab that never quite heals? What if, instead of being one (quickly deleted) step toward success or resolution, the error becomes the climax and the denouement—an end point in itself, or even a goal? Hence the title Kool-Aid Wino, which comes from Trout Fishing in America by poet and author Richard Brautigan, who deliberately fudged words while writing in order to invent new ways of saying things.

The artists in Kool-Aid Wino poke and prod at systems—be they technological, linguistic, musical, or administrative—until they find or create a chink or flaw that sheds light on the whole. Jenny Perlin’s three-channel video projection, Sight Reading, presents three different pianists on each screen, each struggling to play a composition they are seeing for the first time. Choi Dachal’s photographs feature dress shirts that have been pressed, cleaned, and folded. Yet on close inspection, they prove to be two different shirts with slightly varying patterns that have been buttoned together and folded to look like a single shirt. Owen Land, Rotem Linial, and Alice Miceli take a reflexive approach to film and photography, revealing and reveling in glitches and mechanical failures. Frank Heath and Aki Sasamoto disassemble objects to point out ruptures in systems such as urbanism and history that, while abstract, are often deemed airtight and error-proof.     

Errors, as Freud demonstrated in his writings on parapraxis (slips of the tongue), often tip others off to our secret aversions or buried desires, which we strenuously try to conceal. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art works in Kool-Aid Wino redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities. The last line of the pseudonymous chapter in Brautigan’s book reads: “He created his own Kool-Aid reality and was able to illuminate himself by it.” In a sense, each of the artists in this show creates his or her own Kool-Aid reality. Cumulatively the works remind us that uniqueness relies on flaws and our imaginative negotiation in, around, and through them. It is also worth noting that Trout Fishing in America famously ends with the word “mayonaise,” a typo that may not have been intentional, but made it into the final draft.

 

Richard Heys Exhibit " What's in there? Exploring the Beauty and Energy within trees through Woodturning

The UConn Torrington ARTS Project presents an exhibit of Richard Heys' work. "What's in there? Exploring the beauty and energy within trees through woodturning." This exhibit explores the creative work and process of Richard Heys, a fine wood turner whose beautifully turned and sculpted works are accompanied by photographs that chronicle the making of two of his pieces on view in the Whitson Gallery. The exhibit features decorative and utilitarian wooden bowls, vases, lidded boxes and sculptural objects. The exhibition runs from September 16th through November 8th at the campus' Brick Wall Space Gallery and Whitson Gallery. Richard Heys will give an artist's talk in the Whitson Gallery on October 10th at 7pm.

 

Miss Saigon

A classic love story is brought up-to-date in one of the most stunning theatrical spectacles of all time. In Miss Saigon, the creators of Les Misérables bring Puccini's Madame Butterfly to the modern world in a moving testament to the human spirit.

In the turmoil of the Vietnam War, an American soldier and a Vietnamese girl fall in love, only to be separated during the fall of Saigon. Their struggles to find each other over the ensuing years end in tragedy for her and a fighting chance for the child he never knew he had. An international sensation, Miss Saigon is an epic musical masterpiece with a thrilling score.

 

Evening Lecture Series: Sharks and Rays - Feeding Frenzy!

Come learn about the feeding behaviors of sharks and stingrays!

These animals are not the ferocious predators often shown on TV. Shannon Gerry, a professor at Fairfield University, will discuss the diet and feeding mechanisms of several species that live in Long Island Sound.

You will learn that it is safe to go back in the water! $5 suggested donation. Refreshments will be served.

This program, taking place in the Hanson Exploration Station, is part of the Evening Lecture Series, sponsored by Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo Volunteer Association.

 

E.V.Day: Snap!

 he Glass House is pleased to announce its first site-specific exhibition: SNAP! by E.V. Day. Conceived for the building known as Da Monsta - designed by Philip Johnson in 1995 as a visitor center and now a gallery - SNAP! interprets the pavilion's peculiar geometry and atmosphere both inside and out. Day has roped the exterior of Da Monsta with massive climbing webs and populated the interior with an ensemble of recent sculpture that tease out the noir qualities of Johnson's late work.

 

“Faces of China, 1981: Photographs by Tom Zetterstrom”

 Tom Zetterstrom's photographs offer a glimpse of China's people in only the third year of Deng Xiaoping's "Reform and Opening Up."

They were taken before globalization or discos, before cell phones, during Mr. Zetterstrom's 1981 trip hosted by the Yale-China Association. The photographs were exhibited at the Asia Society and toured nationally in the 1980s, but have not been displayed for 30 years.

The people in these color and black-and-white portraits are guileless, everyday people who stand on the brink of enormous social change.

Dates: Wednesday, September 11 through Friday, December 6, 2013.

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 12 Noon-4pm

 

 

Eastern Connecticut Symphony January Concert

 The Eastern Connecticut Symphony concert series begins the New Year on Saturday, January 11, 2014, at 8 PM at the Garde Arts Center.  ECSO Music Director, Toshi Shimada, conducts a program which features, Hyewon Kim, winner of the 2013 ECSO Instrumental Competition, performing Elgar’s Cello Concerto, sponsored by Chelsea Groton Bank.  The audience members will also hear Sibelius Karelia Suite and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No, 2, (the Little Russian.)   Pre-concert conversation at 7 PM with Gary Chapman; post-concert reception free for members of the audience.  Tickets are priced from $32-$62 with senior and student tickets in selected seating areas.  Call the ECSO office at 860-443-2876 or purchase them on the Internet at: www.gardearts.org.  For further information, visit the ECSO website at: www.ectsymphony.com or friend us on Face Book.