Tuesday, September 10 2013

Format: 2014/10/22

Tuesday, September 10 2013

Greenleaf Pottery: Classes in Wheel Thrown Pottery

Classes offer firsthand experience of the entire pottery-making cycle. Beginning emphasis is placed on working with one of the fifteen potter's wheels.  Beginning as well as advanced students are welcome. Sets of eight week classes are offered Tuesday or Thursday evening 6 to 9 p.m.,  year-round. Sign up now to reserve your place.

Call or go to the website for more information. 860-528-6090, www.greenleafpottery.net

 

Gentle Yoga Class in Trumbull

Gentle Yoga Class with certified instructor Jessica DeFeo. Gentle yoga is perfect for beginners and people with physical difficulties such as back pain and knee pain. Class is held at Fairfield County Integrative Family Medicine and Healing Therapies, Trumbull CT. For more information call (203) 445-9060 or visit www.integrativefamilypracticect.com.

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. - 7 p.m.
$10 per class. Registration required. Limit of 8 people per class.
Fairfield County Integrative Family Medicine and Healing Therapies
2 Corporate Drive, Suite 110
Trumbull, CT  06611
 

Discover 19th Century Inventions at New Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum Exhibit

      Victorian era gadgets, technologies and breakthroughs will be on display at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum beginning April 17th through October 6, 2013. What Is It? Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era will engage student and adult audiences in the exploration of mid-to-late 19th century inventions and discoveries in many diverse areas including communication, transportation, manufacturing, medicine, food and recreation.

       Visitors will view cutting-edge Victorian Era technology that were precursors of some of today’s technologies, including telegraphs, dictaphones, gas lighting and early examples of telephones, burglar alarms, stock tickers and much more. They will discover items we still see today, from board games to food such as condensed milk and breakfast cocoa. Artifacts on display include loans from Connecticut's Mattatuck Museum and the Museum of American Finance, New York City, among others.

             The What Is It? exhibit is curated by Raechel Guest. Guest is a Smith College graduate with a Master’s Degree in Collection Management from the prestigious Winterthur Museum. Professor Steven Lubar, a history of technology expert, serves as a special advisor.  Professor Lubar is Professor of the Departments of American Studies, History, and History of Art and Architecture at Brown University.  

            The exhibit is made possible thanks to a grant from the Connecticut Humanities (CTH), a non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds, creates and collaborates on hundreds of cultural programs across Connecticut each year. CTH brings together people of all ages and backgrounds to express, share and explore ideas in thoughtful and productive ways. From local discussion groups to major exhibitions on important historical events, CTH programs engage, enlighten and educate.  Learn more by visiting www.cthumanities.org.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the LMMM Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.  The Museum’s Education Program is made possible in part by a generous donation from AT&T.

Tours for the museum and exhibit are offered Wednesdays through Sundays, 
at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.

 

 

Kool-Aid Wino, new exhibition at Franklin Street Works curated by Claire Barliant

 Franklin Street Works is proud to present Kool-Aid Wino, a group exhibition curated by Brooklyn-based writer and critic Claire Barliant. The exhibition explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani made in the early twenties.  It is on view at Franklin Street Works from July 20 – September 22 with a free, public reception on July 20 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. There will be a performance by Aki Sasamoto during the reception, beginning at 7:00 pm.

The show starts with the widely accepted premise that artistic process relies on trial and error. You try something, you mess up, you move on. But what if you stay with that mistake, or that troubling passage, and make it the focus? What if you let it be awkward, an irritant, wiggle it like a loose tooth or pick at it like a scab that never quite heals? What if, instead of being one (quickly deleted) step toward success or resolution, the error becomes the climax and the denouement—an end point in itself, or even a goal? Hence the title Kool-Aid Wino, which comes from Trout Fishing in America by poet and author Richard Brautigan, who deliberately fudged words while writing in order to invent new ways of saying things.

The artists in Kool-Aid Wino poke and prod at systems—be they technological, linguistic, musical, or administrative—until they find or create a chink or flaw that sheds light on the whole. Jenny Perlin’s three-channel video projection, Sight Reading, presents three different pianists on each screen, each struggling to play a composition they are seeing for the first time. Choi Dachal’s photographs feature dress shirts that have been pressed, cleaned, and folded. Yet on close inspection, they prove to be two different shirts with slightly varying patterns that have been buttoned together and folded to look like a single shirt. Owen Land, Rotem Linial, and Alice Miceli take a reflexive approach to film and photography, revealing and reveling in glitches and mechanical failures. Frank Heath and Aki Sasamoto disassemble objects to point out ruptures in systems such as urbanism and history that, while abstract, are often deemed airtight and error-proof.     

Errors, as Freud demonstrated in his writings on parapraxis (slips of the tongue), often tip others off to our secret aversions or buried desires, which we strenuously try to conceal. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art works in Kool-Aid Wino redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities. The last line of the pseudonymous chapter in Brautigan’s book reads: “He created his own Kool-Aid reality and was able to illuminate himself by it.” In a sense, each of the artists in this show creates his or her own Kool-Aid reality. Cumulatively the works remind us that uniqueness relies on flaws and our imaginative negotiation in, around, and through them. It is also worth noting that Trout Fishing in America famously ends with the word “mayonaise,” a typo that may not have been intentional, but made it into the final draft.

 

Opening Reception: “The Alumni Show II”

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the Center for the Arts, The Alumni Show II looks back at four decades of Wesleyan artists. Building on the first Alumni Show held in November/December 2003 in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the CFA, this exhibition features an entirely new selection of seventeen alumni artists. Their work spans a broad range of contemporary practice and media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, installation art, video art, performance, and films. The artists featured in this exhibition are Ian H. Boyden '95, Stephanie Calvert '08, Rutherford Chang '02, Nicolas Collins '76 MA '79, Renee Green '81, Raphael Griswold '06, John N. Hatleberg '79, Gabriela Herman '03, Elsie Kagan '99, Liz Magic Laser '03, Danielle Mysliwiec '98, Ed Osborn '87, Juliana Romano '04, Aki Sasamoto '04, Arturo Vidich '03, Stephanie Washburn '03, and Ben Weiner '03.

Opening Reception will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, September 10, 2013. Performance by Aki Sasamoto '04 at 7:30pm

 

Exhibition of Works by Barbara Rothenberg

A beloved faculty member of the Silvermine School of Art for over 20 years, this exhibit honors the memory of Barbara Rothenberg, showcasing her accomplishments as a painter, collagist and printmaker.

The public is invited to the open reception on Thursday, August 22nd from 6:30pm to 8:30pm.
The exhibition will be open August 22nd through September 15th.

 

 

Middletown’s Role in the Civil War

Join Wadsworth Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution as member and Historical Society Director Deborah Shapiro gives a presentation on "Middletown’s Role in the Civil War" and a tour of the Civil War exhibit. All are welcome.

 

West Hartford Women's Chorale Open Rehearsals

West Hartford Women’s Chorale Welcomes New Singers to Open Rehearsals

The West Hartford Women's Chorale will hold Open Rehearsals for women to try out a rehearsal or two with no obligation. Open Rehearsals this fall will be held Tuesdays, Sept. 10 and Sept. 17 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Bristow Middle School, 34 Highland Ave., West Hartford 06119. There is no cost to participate. All interested singers are welcome.

This year the West Hartford Women's Chorale celebrates its 10th anniversary as a non-audition community women's chorale. The group performs two concerts each year and offers community performances at Celebrate! West Hartford, the Wadsworth Festival of Trees and the  West Hartford Holiday Stroll. The Chorale is open to all women regardless of previous musical experience. For the last three years, the chorale has been directed by Dr. Ethan Nash.

For more information go to www.whwchorale.org or the West Hartford Women's Chorale on Facebook.

 

Lecture at Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum Explores "Modern" Medicine of the Victorian Era

In this age of “Obamacare” and changing medical care, the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum will take a look back at the history of medicine and the medical breakthroughs of the Victorian era in a lecture on September 10th, 2013. “Technology and Invention: Medical Tales of the 19th Century” will be presented by Dr. Gavin X. McLeod, Associate Clinical Professor at Columbia University and attending physician at Greenwich Hospital. The lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. at the Museum, located at 295 West Avenue in Norwalk. To reserve a seat, please contact the Mansion at 203-838-9799.

The lecture will touch on the many important medical discoveries of the Victoria era still used today such as the stethoscope and X-rays, as well as the initial studies in the areas of vaccination, germ theory and surgical techniques. In addition, attendees will hear of the medical care of historical figures such as U.S. Presidents and how historical events, such as the Civil War, led to major advances in areas such as medical triage, blood transfusions, anesthesia, and pasteurization. 

Dr. McLeod is currently an infectious diseases physician and Director of Continuing Medical Education at Greenwich Hospital. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. He has consistently been noted as one of the top doctors in Infectious Disease in the Tri-state area including this year’s New York Magazine’s Best Doctors andConnecticut Magazine’s Top Docs.
McLeod has been involved in numerous clinical research studies and written or co-written dozens of peer reviewed articles, case studies and other articles on infectious disease. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University and attended the University of Connecticut school of Medicine where he received his M.D degree. He completed his residency and internship in Internal Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, North Shore University Hospital and Cornell University and received his Infectious Disease Fellowship at Harvard’s Deaconess Hospital. 
The lecture is part of a series of lectures at the Museum on “Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era.” The lectures are $25 for members, $30 for non-members. The price includes lecture, lunch and choice of a mansion or exhibit tour. Lunch is courtesy of Michael Gilmartin's Outdoor Cookers. The chair of the Lecture Committee is Mimi Findlay of New Canaan.  
The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the Museum’s Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.
Also on exhibit at the Museum, “What Is It? Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era, “ which is open until October 6th. The “What Is It?” exhibit is made possible in part by a grant from the Connecticut Humanities (CTH), a non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds, creates and collaborates on hundreds of cultural programs across Connecticut each year. CTH brings together people of all ages and backgrounds to express, share and explore ideas in thoughtful and productive ways. From local discussion groups to major exhibitions on important historical events, CTH programs engage, enlighten and educate. Learn more by visiting www.cthumanities.org.
The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum is a National Historic Landmark located at 295 West Avenue in Norwalk. Tours are offered Wednesdays through Sundays at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m. Admittance is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6 for children. Children under 8 are admitted free. For more information on tours and programs, visit www.lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, e-mail info@lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, or call 203-838-9799.
 
 
 
 
 

Zoo Tots

This monthly 45-minute program for children 22 months to four years old, who are accompanied by an adult, may include stories, activities, crafts, and live animals. This session is entitled "Colors of Nature." Pre-registration is required by calling 203-394-6563. The cost is $10 for Zoo members and one child, and $15 for non-members and one child. 

 

E.V.Day: Snap!

 he Glass House is pleased to announce its first site-specific exhibition: SNAP! by E.V. Day. Conceived for the building known as Da Monsta - designed by Philip Johnson in 1995 as a visitor center and now a gallery - SNAP! interprets the pavilion's peculiar geometry and atmosphere both inside and out. Day has roped the exterior of Da Monsta with massive climbing webs and populated the interior with an ensemble of recent sculpture that tease out the noir qualities of Johnson's late work.

 

Eastern Connecticut Symphony January Concert

 The Eastern Connecticut Symphony concert series begins the New Year on Saturday, January 11, 2014, at 8 PM at the Garde Arts Center.  ECSO Music Director, Toshi Shimada, conducts a program which features, Hyewon Kim, winner of the 2013 ECSO Instrumental Competition, performing Elgar’s Cello Concerto, sponsored by Chelsea Groton Bank.  The audience members will also hear Sibelius Karelia Suite and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No, 2, (the Little Russian.)   Pre-concert conversation at 7 PM with Gary Chapman; post-concert reception free for members of the audience.  Tickets are priced from $32-$62 with senior and student tickets in selected seating areas.  Call the ECSO office at 860-443-2876 or purchase them on the Internet at: www.gardearts.org.  For further information, visit the ECSO website at: www.ectsymphony.com or friend us on Face Book.