Wednesday, June 12 2013

Format: 2014/10/02

Wednesday, June 12 2013

Greenleaf Pottery: Classes in Wheel Thrown Pottery

Classes offer firsthand experience of the entire pottery-making cycle. Beginning emphasis is placed on working with one of the fifteen potter's wheels.  Beginning as well as advanced students are welcome. Sets of eight week classes are offered Tuesday or Thursday evening 6 to 9 p.m.,  year-round. Sign up now to reserve your place.

Call or go to the website for more information. 860-528-6090, www.greenleafpottery.net

 

Wesleyan Potters “Celebrations” Show

Gallery/Shop is featuring unique handcrafted gifts for spring and Wesleyan Potters “Celebrations” Show: May 8th  – June 16th.   

Come celebrate with us during regular gallery hours, at Wesleyan Potters Gallery/Shop, 350 S. Main St, Route 17, Middletown, CT!

Gallery Hours: Wed -Fri 10 am - 6 pm, Sat 10-4 and Sunday Noon-4

860-344-0039 www.wesleyanpotters.com

 

Discover 19th Century Inventions at New Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum Exhibit

      Victorian era gadgets, technologies and breakthroughs will be on display at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum beginning April 17th through October 6, 2013. What Is It? Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era will engage student and adult audiences in the exploration of mid-to-late 19th century inventions and discoveries in many diverse areas including communication, transportation, manufacturing, medicine, food and recreation.

       Visitors will view cutting-edge Victorian Era technology that were precursors of some of today’s technologies, including telegraphs, dictaphones, gas lighting and early examples of telephones, burglar alarms, stock tickers and much more. They will discover items we still see today, from board games to food such as condensed milk and breakfast cocoa. Artifacts on display include loans from Connecticut's Mattatuck Museum and the Museum of American Finance, New York City, among others.

             The What Is It? exhibit is curated by Raechel Guest. Guest is a Smith College graduate with a Master’s Degree in Collection Management from the prestigious Winterthur Museum. Professor Steven Lubar, a history of technology expert, serves as a special advisor.  Professor Lubar is Professor of the Departments of American Studies, History, and History of Art and Architecture at Brown University.  

            The exhibit is made possible thanks to a grant from the Connecticut Humanities (CTH), a non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds, creates and collaborates on hundreds of cultural programs across Connecticut each year. CTH brings together people of all ages and backgrounds to express, share and explore ideas in thoughtful and productive ways. From local discussion groups to major exhibitions on important historical events, CTH programs engage, enlighten and educate.  Learn more by visiting www.cthumanities.org.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the LMMM Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.  The Museum’s Education Program is made possible in part by a generous donation from AT&T.

Tours for the museum and exhibit are offered Wednesdays through Sundays, 
at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.

 

 

Steam Punk: Nature and Machine At The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum

Steampunk Art that has influenced everything from product design to fashion to fine art will be on display at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s this spring.  This design movement features a neo-vintage twist on 19th century industrialized looks and Victorian decorative motifs. Steampunk: Nature & Machine, will open on April 25th with a reception from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm and runs until June 15th.   This is the first exhibit dedicated to Steampunk art in Fairfield County.  

           According to IBM’s "Social Sentiment Index", which measures what’s trending on social networks and blogs, 2013 is set to be the year Steampunk surges as a mass-market aesthetic.  The Museum’s exhibit will feature art by renowned Steampunk artists, Bruce Rosenbaum, Leslie Mueller and Katie Shima and co-curated by Rosenbaum and Museum trustee Gail Ingis-Claus.

  •             Bruce Rosenbaum has been dubbed the Steampunk evangelist and guru by Wired Magazine.  His artwork has been on exhibition consistently throughout the Northeastern United States, including the Charles River Museum of Industry, Wooster Street Social Club, The Mark Twain House and Shelburne Museum. Rosenbaum has collaborated with many well-known and emerging Steampunk artists and created the unofficial  Steampunk artists guild Steampuffin.  His design business and home, a retro-future refurbished house, have been featured in Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, The New York Times, CNN, Huffington Post, NPR and on MTV, A&E, Discovery and HGTV.   Rosenbaum lives in Sharon, Massachusetts.
  •             Leslie Mueller is an award-winning art director and artist.  She is represented in private and corporate collections throughout the United States, Asia, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Africa, Japan and Germany.  Mueller’s artwork has been published in House Beautiful, Elle Decor, Southern Living, Manhattan Arts Int’l  and Art Business News magazines and is part of the United States  “Art in the Embassies” program.  Mueller began her studies at the age of thirteen at the Art Institute of Chicago.   She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Southern Methodist University’s  Meadows School of Fine Arts in Dallas, Texas.  She is a resident of Greenwich, Connecticut.
  •             Katie Shima is an artist and architectural designer based in New York City. She has had exhibitions, installations, and performances at the Charles Bank Gallery, Bridge Gallery, Devotion Gallery, Clocktower Gallery, Barnard College, The Tank, SoHo 20, among others. Shima is a founding member of the electronic noise art group Loud Objects.  Residencies with the Loud Objects include Art On Air in New York and Det Jyske Kunstakademi in Aarhus, Denmark. She is currently working as an architectural designer at Situ Studio. Shima received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia College and a Master’s in Architecture from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the LMMM Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.  The Museum’s Education Program is made possible in part by a generous donation from AT&T.

             Tours for the museum and exhibit are offered Wednesdays through Sundays, 
at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.

 

 

Sunken Garden Poetry Festival Opening Night

Enjoy two hours of world-class poetry and music among the blooms of Hill-Stead’s historic Sunken Garden. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith opens Season 21, with music by Jackie McLean Youth Jazz Ensemble. Admission is $10 per person, free ages 18 and under. Free on-site parking available. Bring food or purchase on site. More information: sunkengardenpoetry.org, 860-677-4787 ext 134 or poetry@hillstead.org.

 

Lecture at Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum On Connecticut as the ‘Silicon Valley of the 19th Century’

Connecticut’s zenith as a technological and industrial center will be the focus of a lecture entitled, “Silicon Valley of the 19th Century: Rediscovering Connecticut’s Industrial Heritageon Wednesday, June 12, at 11:00am at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum.  Guest speaker, William Hosley a cultural scholar and expert on Connecticut history and heritage tourism, will discuss how the Connecticut Valley was transformed into America's first high-tech industrial corridor and the vanguard of an internationally significant technology-based revolution that changed the world of work.    

            This is the second in a series of lectures at the Mansion on “Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era.”  The lectures are $25 for members, $30 for non-members per session. Packages for all seven lectures can be purchased in advance for $150 for members/ $180 for non-members and will include one free event.  The price includes lecture, lunch and choice of a mansion or exhibit tour.  Lunch is courtesy of Michael Gilmartin's Outdoor Cookers.  The chair of the Lecture Committee is Mimi Findlay of New Canaan.

            William Hosley, the principal of Terra Firma Northeast, is an independent scholar, cultural resource consultant, planner, writer, and photographer. He was formerly Director of the New Haven Museum and Connecticut Landmarks where he cared for a chain of historic attractions throughout Connecticut. Prior to that, he was a curator and exhibition developer at Wadsworth Atheneum.  Hosley has lectured throughout the country and served as a content specialist for PBS, BBC and CPTV film documentaries. He has also written articles for Connecticut Magazine, Boston Magazine, Antiques, American Heritage and others.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum’s 2013 cultural and educational programs are made possible by generous funding from the LMMM Distinguished Benefactors: The Xerox Foundation, Klaff’s, Mrs. Cynthia C. Brown and The Maurice Goodman Foundation.  The Museum’s Education Program is made possible in part by a generous donation from AT&T.

            Also on exhibit at the Museum, “What Is It?  Technologies and Discoveries of the Victorian Era “ which is open until October 6th and  “Steampunk: Nature & Machine” running until June 5. 

            The “What Is It?” exhibit is made possible in part thanks to a grant from the Connecticut Humanities (CTH), a non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds, creates and collaborates on hundreds of cultural programs across Connecticut each year.  CTH brings together people of all ages and backgrounds to express, share and explore ideas in thoughtful and productive ways. From local discussion groups to major exhibitions on important historical events, CTH programs engage, enlighten and educate.  Learn more by visiting www.cthumanities.org.

            The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum is a National Historic Landmark located at 295 West Avenue in Norwalk.  Tours are offered Wednesdays through Sundays, at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.  Admittance is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6 for children.  Children under 8 are admitted free.   For more information on tours and programs, visit www.lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, e-mail info@lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, or call 203-838-9799.

 

 

Eastern Connecticut Symphony January Concert

 The Eastern Connecticut Symphony concert series begins the New Year on Saturday, January 11, 2014, at 8 PM at the Garde Arts Center.  ECSO Music Director, Toshi Shimada, conducts a program which features, Hyewon Kim, winner of the 2013 ECSO Instrumental Competition, performing Elgar’s Cello Concerto, sponsored by Chelsea Groton Bank.  The audience members will also hear Sibelius Karelia Suite and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No, 2, (the Little Russian.)   Pre-concert conversation at 7 PM with Gary Chapman; post-concert reception free for members of the audience.  Tickets are priced from $32-$62 with senior and student tickets in selected seating areas.  Call the ECSO office at 860-443-2876 or purchase them on the Internet at: www.gardearts.org.  For further information, visit the ECSO website at: www.ectsymphony.com or friend us on Face Book.