Friday, February 15 2013

Format: 2014/09/02

Friday, February 15 2013

Promise of Freedom: The Emancipation Proclamation

 

Exhibit and programs commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and its significance over time, featuring Abraham Lincoln’s signed copy, rare slavery artifacts, prints, political cartoons and more.

 

 

Promise of Freedom: The Emancipation Proclamation

Exhibit and programs commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and its significance over time, featuring Abraham Lincoln’s signed copy, rare slavery artifacts, prints, political cartoons and more.

 

UConn Surya

Dancers for a Difference

A Husky Headliner Event 

Founded in 2004, UConn Surya is a twenty-two member South Asian student fusion dance club. The epitome of East meets West, Surya's choreography represents an inspiration of classical dance and beats with a modern edge.

Bharata Natyam is one of the oldest forms of Classical dance in India. It is more than 2000 years old and it comes from Tamil Nadu which is located in South India.  Originally, Bharata Natyam was only danced by women in the temples. The dance was considered a religious offering to the gods. Because Bharata Natyam is a religious dance, dancers start with a small prayer to mother earth. This prayer is performed to apologize to god for “stomping” one’s feet on the ground. Many believe the dance form originated when the Hindu God Brahma revealed the dance to the sage Bharata who then summarized the art form in the Sanskrit manuscript the Natya Shastra. The Natya Shastra is divided into two parts, Nritta which means pure dance and Nritya which means dramatic interpretive dance.

During the British occupation of India, Bharata Natyam was discouraged and repressed but during India’s freedom struggle in the first half of the twentieth century, the dance was revived by nationalists seeking to restore India’s unique cultural heritage. Today, Bharata Natyam is a very popular dance among Indians and non-resident Indians and is a source of immense cultural pride. There is usually at least one Bharata Natyam schools in major urban areas with Indian communities. Often these Bharata Natyam schools have seen fusions between the dance and Western dances such as ballet and jazz showing the influence Indian Classical dance has exerted. 

Kathak traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient northern India, known as Kathaks, or story tellers. These bards, performing in village squares and temple courtyards, mostly specialized in recounting mythological and moral tales from the scriptures, and embellished their recitals with hand gestures and facial expressions. It was quintessential theatre, using instrumental and vocal music along with stylized gestures, to enliven the stories. With the advent of Mughal culture, Kathak became a sophisticated chamber art. Patronized by art loving rulers, the practitioners of Kathak worked at refining its dramatic and rhythmic aspects, delighting elite audiences with their mastery over rhythm and the stylized mime.

The technique of Kathak today is characterized by fast rhythmic footwork set to complex time cycles. The footwork is matched by the accompanying percussion instruments such as tabla and pakhawaj, and the dancer and percussionists often indulge in a virtuoso display of rhythmic wizardry. The dance movements include numerous pirouettes executed at lightning speed and ending in statuesque poses. The interpretative portion, based on tales of Radha and Krishna and other mythological lore, contains subtle gestures and facial expressions. Lucknow, Banaras and Jaipur are recognized as the three schools, or gharanas, where this art was nurtured and where the interpretative and rhythmic aspects were refined to a high standard.

 

Donald Axleroad: “Disintegration of Truth & Trust”

A new series of work created in response to current events and the contemporary issues of today’s world.  Through imagery and symbols, the artist explores the dissolution of American culture; a time and place where dishonesty has become the norm, and for many, innocence has been lost and the American Dream has been shattered.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

January 6th through February 17th, 2013

 

 

Tina Rohrer: “A Commitment to Color, Movement and Geometry”

This new exhibit is a tribute, honoring the life and art of Tina Rohrer, who passed away in the summer of 2012.  The selection of work, in a variety of media, expresses the artists’ love of movement and color through geometric constructions.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m.– 5 p.m.

January 6 - February 17, 2013

 

 

Historical Exhibit: “The Silvermine Print Collection”

Showcasing a selection of works from the current Silvermine print collection, which consists of over 200 prints from renowned artists.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m.– 5 p.m.

January 6th through February 17th, 2013

 

 

New Members Exhibition

Each year in the spring and fall, artists are selected, through a jurying process to become new members of the Silvermine Guild of Artists.  This exhibit showcases the works of five new Guild Artist members inducted in the spring and fall of 2012. The new members include: Mindy Green, Shelby Head, Heather Houston, Lara Ivanovic, and Hank Paper.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m.– 5 p.m.

January 6th through February 17th, 2013         

 

 

 

Cult Classics: VAMPYRES

 

Cult Classics

VAMPYRES (1974)

Thursday, February 14 at 9 p.m.
 

Carte Blanche: FREE | Members: $6 | Students & Seniors: $8 | Nonmembers: $11

Vampyres

ABOUT THE FILM: See the vampire movie that started it all…years before there was TWILIGHT,TRUE BLOOD and numerous other knockoffs, VAMPYRES came to movie screens in 1974, quickly establishing itself as a trendsetter for the genre while gleaning a much deserved rabid cult following. The ads for the film delivered on the promise that "they share the pleasures of the flesh, and unleashed the horrors of the grave!" The stunning actresses Marianne Morris and Anulka star as bisexual seductresses who roam the English countryside with an insatiable lust for the blood of mortals as well as the succulent bodies of each other. Director José Ramón Larraz packs this landmark film with chilling atmosphere, shocking bloodshed and some of the most torrid sexuality of any vampire movie in horror history. It’s the perfect Valentine’s Day bonbon to share with your beloved! Not Rated | 88 minutes | In English

 

Mt. Washington Century Ride Registration OPEN

The Mt. Washington Century ride is fast becoming known as New England’s Most Challenging Centurytm.  We have mountain passes that thrill the eye and challenge the soul. For those wanting to ‘test their personal best’, the Mt. Washington Century Ride is it!   Prizes, support vehicles, aid stations, on site theraputic sports masage.  No landscape rivals the natural beauty of Mt. Washington and the Presidential Range, and a Century Ride through three notches and around the base of New England’s tallest mountain is without equal. The 100-mile route supports the Tin Mountain Conservation Center  and it’s great work promoting an appreciation for the natural world while instilling the bedrock principles of sound stewardship and sustainable lifestyles.   Abbreviated 40- and 80-mile routes provide wonderful rides for those wanting a little less than a Century.

 

"Nudes and Nudibranchs'

 Award-winning painter Frank Bruckmann and sculptor Gar Waterman will exhibit their most recent  work at the Kehler Liddell Gallery: "Nudes and Nudibranchs," from February 7- March 10, 2013. Frank Bruckmann and Gar Waterman are both traditionalists who use direct observation of nature and carefully applied technique to craft their work. Bruckmann's brushstrokes caress oil paint with an expert and familiar hand into the eternally complex landscape of the female figure, while Waterman's sculpture bends the liquid sheen of polished stone into impressions of rhythm and grace from the marine environment. 

 

FOOD-WATER-LIFE---LUCY+JORGE ORTA

Gallery Hours: Tuesday - Sunday, noon to 5pm

 

The work of Lucy+Jorge Orta explores the major concerns that define the 21st century: biodiversity, environmental conditions, climate change, and exchange among peoples. At the same time, this work embodies the philosophy that steers their pioneering art practice, “the ethics of aesthetics.” As heirs to the practice of social sculpture, formulated by Joseph Beuys in the 1960s, the Ortas’ works are, in a sense, reflections of their own function—beguiling assemblages that are the platform for the preparation of food, mechanisms that actually purify water, and elements that they created for their 2007 expedition to Antarctica and that are part of an effort to amend Article XIII of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The works in the exhibition are metaphors-in-action, constructions that perform the tasks of which they are emblematic. It is in their ability to actually function, albeit awkwardly and haltingly, that these objects gain power as works of art created to move us to awareness and action. FOOD-WATER-LIFE---LUCY+JORGE ORTA is curated by guest curators Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c2 curatorsquared, and is co-sponsored by the College of the Environment with additional support from the Department of Art and Art History.

 

"Parallel and feeding into their studio practice of sculpture and painting, [Lucy+Jorge Orta] stage ephemeral interventions, performances, [and] workshops, which explore the crucial themes of the contemporary world."

Sublime Magazine (London)

 

Greenleaf Pottery: Classes in Wheel Thrown Pottery

Classes offer firsthand experience of the entire pottery-making cycle. Beginning emphasis is placed on working with one of the fifteen potter's wheels.  Beginning as well as advanced students are welcome. Sets of eight week classes are offered Tuesday or Thursday evening 6 to 9 p.m.,  year-round. Sign up now to reserve your place.

Call or go to the website for more information. 860-528-6090, www.greenleafpottery.net

 

(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs

Since the invention of photography, viewers have responded with immediacy to photographs of people. Roland Barthes wrote about the indexical nature of the photograph--the fact that "that has been," the evidence that a certain person once stood in front of the camera. “(Re)viewing Bodies: Selected American Photographs” examines the ways in which 20th-century American photographers have represented the body, whether as subject or compositional element. Topics include the abstracted or fragmented body, the body and labor, the body and performance, the body in social situations, and the body in pain. The exhibition includes works by Diane Arbus, Larry Burrows, Harry Callahan, Judy Dater, Gordon Parks, and Jerry Uelsmann. Organized by Wesleyan University students in the Museum Studies seminar, the show includes more than fifty American photographs from the Davison Art Center collection.

 

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 7, 2013 from 5pm to 7pm; Gallery Talk by student curators at 5:30pm

 

Gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4pm.

 

 

 

Eastern Connecticut Symphony January Concert

 The Eastern Connecticut Symphony concert series begins the New Year on Saturday, January 11, 2014, at 8 PM at the Garde Arts Center.  ECSO Music Director, Toshi Shimada, conducts a program which features, Hyewon Kim, winner of the 2013 ECSO Instrumental Competition, performing Elgar’s Cello Concerto, sponsored by Chelsea Groton Bank.  The audience members will also hear Sibelius Karelia Suite and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No, 2, (the Little Russian.)   Pre-concert conversation at 7 PM with Gary Chapman; post-concert reception free for members of the audience.  Tickets are priced from $32-$62 with senior and student tickets in selected seating areas.  Call the ECSO office at 860-443-2876 or purchase them on the Internet at: www.gardearts.org.  For further information, visit the ECSO website at: www.ectsymphony.com or friend us on Face Book.