Wednesday, November 14 2012

Format: 2014/07/29

Wednesday, November 14 2012

Pueblo Pottery; Stories in Clay Exhibit

In the Rio Grande River Valley of central New Mexico and eastern Arizona, the Pueblos, a people spread over 19 communities, continue to practice their ancient art of pottery-making.  Descendents of the Anasazi, the Pueblo People, still use the traditional coiling methods and decorative patterns that have distinguished their work for centuries..

This exhibit compares and contrasts the unique style of each Pueblo community and highlights individual artists who have shaped this timeless craft.

 The museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10:00am - 5:00pm* and Sunday 12:00pm to 5:00pm *      *Last admission 4:30pm

 

 

Exhibit: Cecilia Moy Fradet: “Dreams of Devotion and Delight”

A new series of work exploring the inner landscape of the artists’ dreams, blending the commercial with the spiritual.  Delighting in the pop culture of Mickey Mouse, the material expression of joy and all things possible, the artist melds Mickey and Buddha into one sacred Mandela, exploring the boundaries between reality and perception.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

November 11th through December 20th, 2012

 

Exhibit: Susan White: “Picture Perfect”

The 50s are often portrayed as the ‘perfect decade’ of American History.  In this new exhibit, the artist reflects the images of this era with oversized graphite drawings of black and white photographs of a ‘picture perfect’ 1950’s family.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 – 5 p.m.

 

Exhibit: Guild Group Show: “Important Incidentals”

Featuring photographic works by Miggs Burroughs, Leigh Leibel, Jeremy Saladyga, Alan Shulik, Marjorie Wolfe and Torrance York.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 1 – 5 p.m.

 

 

Historical Exhibit: “Reuben Nakian: Eight Decades of Creation”

Showcasing his small sculptures and works on paper, Reuben Nakian is a major figure in 20th Century art.

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday – Saturday: 12 p.m. – 5 pm; Sunday: 1 – 5 p.m.

 

White

Kehler Liddell Gallery begins the holiday season with a group show inspired by one word, WHITE. Each painter, sculptor, print maker and photographer began somewhere with white and in the end created something with a more memorable and melodious voice than one would ever expect of white.

 

 

Franklin Street Works celebrates its one-year with the original exhibition 'Working Alternatives'

Franklin Street Works presents the original exhibition Working Alternatives: Breaking Bread, Art Broadcasting, and Collective Action, on view from October 27, 2012 - January 13, 2013. The exhibition looks at three threads of alternative art space histories and examines how engaged, inclusive strategies are still being used to break down perceived barriers between contemporary art and its audiences. The themes covered in Working Alternatives are conviviality and food, artists who use media (newspapers, television, and radio) as platforms for artworks, and artist collectives in the US, explored through an open archive gathered specifically for this exhibition.

Originally Working Alternatives was designed to be the backdrop for our first annual fundraiser, but Franklin Street Works is postponing that event until the spring so the indoor/outdoor extravaganza will coincide with warmer weather and have less proximity to long-standing regional art events. If you saved the date for our fundraiser, however, don’t despair and keep it on your calendars – there is still a party! Working Alternatives will open on the same night, October 27, from 5 p.m. -8 p.m. with a free, public reception. The evening will include a lively performance of San Francisco artist Tom Marioni’s “Drinking Beer Sonata with 13 Players” where thirteen people will create music by blowing into beer bottles based on Marioni’s instructions.

For Working Alternatives, curators Mackenzie Schneider, Terri C Smith, and Jess Wilcox explore three threads of alternative art platforms and production: conviviality and food as components in alternative art space programming and mission (Wilcox); artists using media such as radio, television, and newspapers as alternative venues for presenting work (Schneider); and artist collectives presented in a living archive with weekly changing exhibitions using archive materials (Smith). In addition to historical examples, the exhibition also includes original artworks by contemporary artists that reflect and expand on the showʼs themes. Working Alternatives’ artists include: Paul Branca, Jaime Davidovich, ESP TV, Group Material, Ann Hirsch, Tom Marioni, Anna Ostoya, Legacy Russell, Chris Sollars and Jerome Waag. Franklin Street Works is also excited to collaborate on several off-site artworks, including the live radio broadcast of an Ann Hirsch performance on WPKN, Bridgeport, and collages by Anna Ostoya in the Stamford Advocate via four, monthly ads during the show’s run. 

 

Guilford Art Center's Artistry Holiday Sale of Fine American Craft

Guilford Art Center's annual Artistry Holiday Sale of Fine American Craft features handmade works by more than 300 artists from across America, including pottery, jewelry, glass, fiber, ornaments, accessories, toys, specialty foods and more. New works are added throughout the course of the event, encouraging visitors to return to find one-of-a-kind finds. Support American artists, the arts, and small businesses.

 

Brookfield Craft Center Holiday Exhibition

Brookfield Craft Center’s 37th Annual Holiday Exhibition will feature an extraordinary collection of contemporary American craft for the holidays: handmade works by more than 140 selected artists in jewelry, wearable fiber, ceramics, toys, glass, wood, paper and steel. All purchases benefit the Craft Center’s education programs, and provide support for independent artists. This Holiday sale will kick off with a Special Members only preview November 2nd. Consider becoming a member today. For more information on membership for Gallery hours please visit brookfieldcraft.org or call 203-775-4526. 

 

 

 

Virginia Woolf and Julia Stephen Book Launch at Columbia University

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

A Celebration of Literature and Narrative Medicine.
A READING AND DISCUSSION TO LAUNCH THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF VIRGINIA WOOLF WITH HER MOTHER, JULIA STEPHEN.
On Being Ill with Notes from Sick Rooms by Virginia Woolf and Julia Stephen

"Woolf and Stephen will certainly change the way readers think of illness." — Publishers Weekly (10.15.12)

A book launch celebrating the Paris Press 10th anniversary edition of Virginia Woolf’s On Being Ill. With the new addition of Notes from Sick Rooms by Woolf’s mother, Julia Stephen, marking the first book publication of Woolf and her mother. The new On Being Ill keeps Hermione Lee’s extraordinary Introduction and adds a new Introduction by Mark Hussey for Notes from Sick Rooms, and a new brilliant Afterword by Rita Charon.

Featuring comments and readings by
Rita Charon, physician and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine
Mark Hussey, Pace University and acclaimed Virginia Woolf scholar
Judith Kelman, Director of Visible Ink Writing Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering
Elizabeth Lorde-Rollins, physician and poet
Introductions by Janlori Goldman, Columbia University professor, and Jan Freeman, Director of Paris Press and poet

Paris Press is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) literary press, publishing groundbreaking work by women writers that has beenoverlooked by the independent and mainstream publishing words. 
 
Co-sponsored by a wide variety of departments at Columbia University and Paris Press.

 

 

Music & Public Life: Ben Ratliff of The New York Times











Ben Ratliff has been a jazz and pop critic for The New York Times since 1996. He has written three books: The Jazz Ear: Conversations Over Music (2008); Coltrane: The Story of a Sound (2007) a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Jazz: A Critic’s Guide to the 100 Most Important Recordings (2002).

 

With the Music & Public Life series, Wesleyan University is celebrating and studying the sounds, words, and spirit of music in public at the local, national, and transnational levels through concerts, workshops, gatherings, and courses, all designed to cross disciplines and engage the campus and Greater Middletown communities.