Black History Month

Black History Month

Black History Month at CPTV

CPTV celebrates February with a host of Black History Month programming on its channels. See below for a list of television programming and help us celebrate the month!

CPTV

POV – Homegoings

Sunday, February 2 at 10:00 a.m. & Tuesday, February 4 at 11:00 p.m.

Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African American funerals are brought to life. Filmed at Owens Funeral Home in New York City's historic Harlem neighborhood, "Homegoings" takes an up-close look at the rarely seen world of undertaking in the black community, where funeral rites draw on a rich palette of tradition, history and celebration. Combining cinema verite with intimate interviews and archival photographs, the film paints a portrait of the dearly departed, their grieving families and a man who sends loved ones "home."

 

American Masters – Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth

Sunday, February 9 at 2:00 p.m.

Most famous for her seminal novel "The Color Purple," writer / activist Alice Walker celebrates her 70th birthday. Born February 9, 1944, into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia, her life unfolded during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the Civil Rights Movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Quincy Jones, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem, Sapphire, and Walker herself. 90 minutes.

 

Independent Lens – Spies of Mississippi

Sunday, February 16 at 10:00 a.m. and Tuesday, February 18 at 11:00 p.m.

This film tells the story of a secret spy agency formed by the state of Mississippi to preserve segregation during the 1950s and '60s. Granted broad powers, this commission investigated citizens and organizations in attempts to derail the civil rights movement.

 

Independent Lens – Soul Food Junkies

Saturday, February 22 at 9:30 a.m.

Baffled by his dad's reluctance to change his traditional soul food diet in the face of a health crisis, filmmaker Byron Hurt sets out to learn more about this culinary tradition and it's relevance to black cultural identity. The African American love affair with soul food is deep-rooted, complex, and in some tragic cases, deadly. This film puts this culinary tradition under the microscope to examine both its benefits and consequences. Hurt looks at the socioeconomics of predominantly black neighborhoods, where it can be difficult to find healthy options and wonders if soul food has become an addiction in his community.

 

 

CPTV4U

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange Upaj: Improvise

Sunday, February 2 at 10:00 p.m. and Thursday, February 6 at 8:00 p.m.

Sixty-eight-year-old artist Das exemplifies the elegance and mathematical precision of kathak, a classical dance of North India. Jason, a 32-year- old African-American tap dancer, hails from the freestyle, street-wise American tradition of contemporary tap. The two join forces and an unlikely friendship develops that bridges continents, generations, cultures and communities.

 

POV – American Promise

Thursday, February 6 at 9:00 p.m., Monday, February 10 at noon

This film spans 13 years as Joe Brewster and Michele Stephenson, middle-class African-American parents in Brooklyn, N.Y.., turn their cameras on their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun, who make their way through one of the most prestigious private schools in the country. Chronicling the boys' divergent paths from kindergarten through high school graduation at Manhattan's Dalton School, this documentary presents complicated truths about America's struggle to come of age on issues of race, class and opportunity.

 

Independent Lens – Spies of Mississippi

Wednesday, February 12 at 10:00 p.m.

This film tells the story of a secret spy agency formed by the state of Mississippi to preserve segregation during the 1950s and '60s. Granted broad powers, this commission investigated citizens and organizations in attempts to derail the civil rights movement.

 

Black In Latin America (Four-Part Series)

Wednesdays at 8:00 p.m. (February 5, 12, 19 & 26) and Fridays at 1:00 p.m. (February 7, 14, 21 & 28)

Black in Latin America, a four-part series on the influence of African descent on Latin America, is a production from renowned Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., writer and presenter of several acclaimed PBS series.  This series examines how Africa and Europe came together to create the rich cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean.  Latin America is often associated with music, monuments and sun, but each of the six countries featured in Black in Latin America including the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, Mexico, and Peru, has a secret history. On his journey, Professor Gates discovers, behind a shared legacy of colonialism and slavery, vivid stories and people marked by African roots. Latin America and the Caribbean have the largest concentration of people with African ancestry outside Africa - up to 70 percent of the population in some countries. The region imported over ten times as many slaves as the United States, and kept them in bondage far longer. On this series of journeys, Professor Gates celebrates the massive influence of millions of people of African descent on the history and culture of Latin America and the Caribbean, and considers why and how their contribution is often forgotten or ignored.

 

American Masters – Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth

Thursday, February 13 at 8:00 p.m. & Monday, February 17 at noon

Most famous for her seminal novel "The Color Purple," writer / activist Alice Walker celebrates her 70th birthday. Born February 9, 1944, into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia, her life unfolded during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the Civil Rights Movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Quincy Jones, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem, Sapphire, and Walker herself. 90 minutes.

 

American Masters – Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll
Thursday, February 13 at 9:30 p.m.

During the 1940s, 50s and 60s, Southern-born, Chicago-raised and New York-made Sister Rosetta Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into the secular world of popular rock 'n roll, inspiring the male icons of the genre. This flamboyant African-American gospel superstar, with her spectacular virtuosity on the newly electrified guitar, was a natural-born performer and a rebel -- one of the most important singer-musicians of the 20th century. She is acknowledged as a major influence not only on generations of black musicians -- including Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Isaac Hayes and Etta James -- but also on white stars such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash.

 

CPTV Sports

Jesse Owens, American Experience

Sunday, February 2 at 8:00 p.m., Saturday, February 8 at 6:30 p.m., & Wednesday, February 19 at 6:00 p.m. & 11:00 p.m.

On April 2, 1936, when the 22-year-old son of a sharecropper entered the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, he was, he later remembered, barely able to control his anger. "I was angry because of the insults that Hitler and the other German leaders had hurled at me and my Negro teammates on the Olympic squad." The young athlete would channel his raw emotions into some of the most remarkable achievements in the history of athletics, winning four gold medals. To tell the story of Owens' remarkable victories in the face of Nazi racism, this film begins in the poor Cleveland neighborhood where the young athlete grew up; details his early career; describes Adolf Hitler's outsized ambitions for the 1936 Olympics; explores the movement in Western democracies to boycott the event; and explains the pressures on Owens to attend. The film also reveals the unlikely relationship Owens struck up at the games with his German rival Carl "Luz" Long and shows that, in the end, despite his success in Germany, Owens struggled to find a place for himself in a United States that was still wrestling to overcome its own deeply entrenched racism.

 

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange – Doin’ It in the Park

Monday, Febraury 3 at 9:30 p.m., Friday, February 7 at 8:30 a.m., Saturday, February 8 at 5:30 p.m. & Wednesday, February 12 at 8:00 p.m.

The one-hour documentary visits 180 city basketball courts throughout New York City's five boroughs to uncover the world of pick-up basketball. Playground legends, NBA athletes and everyday players tell the story and show off their athleticism (and trash-talking) on local basketball courts.

 

Black KungFu Experience

Friday, February 14 at 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, February 15 at 11:00 p.m.

The Black KungFu Experience introduces kungfu's African-American pioneers, men who challenged convention and overturned preconceived notions while mastering the ancient art. The four martial artists profiled include Ron Van Clief, an ex-Marine and Vietnam veteran who starred in more than 40 kungfu films and earned the nickname "Black Dragon" from Bruce Lee. Their compelling stories illustrate how kungfu began as - and remains - a unique crucible of the black experience. In particular, kungfu's themes of the underdog triumphing against the odds resonated in black communities across the United States.

 

Unforgiveable Blackness: The Rise & Fall of Jack Johnson

Part 1 – Monday, February 17 at 10:00p.m., Saturday, February 22 at 10:30p.m. and Sunday, February 23 at 3:00p.m.

Part 2 – Sunday, February 23 at 5:00 p.m., Monday, February 24 at 10:00 p.m. and Saturday, March 1 at 10:30 p.m.

Follow Jack Johnson's remarkable journey from his humble beginnings in Galveston, Texas, as the son of former slaves, to his entry into the brutal world of professional boxing, where, in turn-of-the-century Jim Crow America, the heavyweight champion was an exclusively "white" title. Johnson lived his life out loud, wearing fancy clothes, driving fast cars and openly flaunting the conventions of the time by dating and then marrying white women. Despite the odds,Johnson was able to batter his way up through the professional ranks, and in 1908 he became the first African American to earn the title Heavyweight Champion of the World. Johnson's victory set in motion a worldwide search for a "white hope" to restore the title to whites. On July 4, 1910, in Reno , Nevada, ex-champion Jim Jeffries, the new "Great White Hope," came out of retirement to challenge Johnson. Johnson easily won the contest, billed as the Battle of the Century, despite a hostile crowd and a steady stream of racial epithets hurled from Jeffries' corner. Johnson's victory provoked race riots all around the country, but his troubles were only just beginning.

 

Jesse Owens: Enduring Spirit

Monday, February 24 at 9:30 p.m.

The story of Jesse Owens, the son of Alabama sharecroppers who became one of the most celebrated athletes in the world after winning four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Owens attended the Ohio State University where he ran track and shattered many collegiate records. This program looks at the impact Owens had after he finished competing and his long relationship with Ohio State.