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Updated: 52 min 25 sec ago

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

3 hours 43 min ago

One nonprofit in Tulsa has flipped the script on preschool. The Community Action Project says its premise simple: To help kids, it says, you often have to help their parents.

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Income Inequality Is A Major Barrier To Attending College

3 hours 43 min ago

Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Suzanne Mettler of Cornell University, author of the new book, Degrees of Inequality: How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream.

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One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

4 hours 3 min ago

One Tulsa, Okla., nonprofit believes that improving poor kids' prospects also requires preparing their parents for well-paying jobs. The program's director says managing both is a tough nut to crack.

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Who's Getting Preschool Right? Researchers Point To Tulsa

April 22, 2014 - 4:14pm

A national debate over universal preschool has raised an important question: What does high-quality pre-K look like? Researchers say the preschool program in Tulsa, Okla., is among the nation's best.

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Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

April 22, 2014 - 11:01am

The Lumina Foundation says nearly 40 percent of adults held college degrees in 2012 — the biggest one-year jump since 2008. And it says that 60 percent college attainment is "within reach" by 2025.

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What Exactly Is 'High-Quality' Preschool?

April 22, 2014 - 5:03am

Many educators tout the benefits of preschool, but there's no clear standard for what qualifies as a quality program. Researchers say that when it comes to pre-K, Tulsa, Okla., gets it right.

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For Early Childhood Education, Tulsa, Okla., Stands Out

April 22, 2014 - 5:03am

Many states are planning to expand early childhood education programs, but what constitutes a high-quality pre-K program? Researchers say the city of Tulsa, Okla., has come up with a winning formula.

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Evidence Of Racial, Gender Biases Found In Faculty Mentoring

April 22, 2014 - 4:56am

Research found faculty in academic departments linked to more lucrative professions are more likely to discriminate against women and minorities than faculty in fields linked to less lucrative jobs.

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A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

April 21, 2014 - 12:17pm

Richard Rhoda of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission discusses a new program that will cover up to two years of community college tuition for all graduates of the state's high schools.

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A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

April 20, 2014 - 5:00pm

Educators say the middle grades are a key time time to get kids jazzed about science, but many teachers say they lack the tools they need. In Chicago, a science museum is helping to fill the the gap.

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'Like Little Language Vacuum Cleaners,' Kids Suck Up Swear Words

April 20, 2014 - 4:25pm

Linguist and curse-word expert Timothy Jay says by the time children head to school, they have a well-developed palate of bad words.

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New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

April 18, 2014 - 11:57am

President of the Muslim Democratic Club of New York Linda Sarsour discusses why she wants the city's public schools to close on holidays like Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.

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15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

April 18, 2014 - 11:51am

The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.

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Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

April 18, 2014 - 3:31am

Central High School in Tuscaloosa, Ala., was once considered a model of desegregation. Today, the school's population is 99 percent black. One family's story underscores three generations of change.

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You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class

April 17, 2014 - 11:45am

Government benefits enable military veterans to attend college, but accessing them is complicated. So how can veterans pay for higher education?

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Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

April 17, 2014 - 5:07am

A new idea is making the rounds in education circles. Under the plan, states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate.

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RIP FCAT, The Florida Test With A Chorus Of Detractors

April 16, 2014 - 4:00pm

The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, or FCAT, is being replaced by a test aligned to the Common Core State Standards. StateImpact Florida's Sammy Mack remembers FCAT and its controversial run.

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High School's Most Dreaded Test Gets A Makeover

April 16, 2014 - 4:00pm

The College Board outlined changes today for its SAT, pairing the news with a few sample questions. NPR's Cory Turner details the makeover students can expect to find in spring of 2016.

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The New SAT: Less Vocabulary, More Linear Equations

April 16, 2014 - 4:00pm

The new version of the standardized test for college admissions, set to go into effect in 2016, will do away with obscure vocabulary words and cut multiple choice answer options from five to four.

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How One Michigan City Is Sending Kids To College Tuition-Free

April 16, 2014 - 3:41am

In 2005, a group of anonymous donors in Kalamazoo launched a bold program. It pays for graduates of the city's public schools to attend any of Michigan's public universities or community colleges.

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