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Updated: 1 hour 4 min ago

His Camera Takes Us To The World 'We Must Preserve'

3 hours 36 min ago

In the new exhibit "Genesis," the noted photographer Sebastiao Salgado shares his vision of "a kind of state of humanity of the planet," from Amazon tribes to frozen Siberia.

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'Murdersquishing' Them To Death: How Little Bees Take On Enormous Hornets

5 hours 27 min ago

They are small. They are weak. They are vulnerable. But these little bees take on a humongous predator in the most ingenious way.

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The Poor Don't Always Benefit From Democracy, Mortality Rates Show

12 hours 18 min ago

Is Democracy a key to better levels of health in a country? That's long been the belief, but we hear about some research that shows that isn't always the case.

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How NASA's New Spaceships Stack Up

13 hours 1 sec ago

Earlier this week, NASA awarded two contracts for new spaceships to commercial companies. Here's how they compare.

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A Frightening Curve: How Fast Is The Ebola Outbreak Growing?

September 18, 2014 - 6:00pm

Health leaders now say the Ebola epidemic is growing exponentially. That means, if nothing changes in the next few weeks, we could see at least 60,000 Ebola cases by the end of 2014.

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A Coastal Paradise Confronts Its Watery Future

September 18, 2014 - 5:49pm

With rising seas, cities like Satellite Beach, Fla., are debating options: defend the shoreline to avoid destruction, or retreat, withdrawing homes and businesses from the water's edge.

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Sweet: Dunkin' Donuts and Krispy Kreme Pump Up Pledge On Palm Oil

September 18, 2014 - 4:33pm

Two major doughnut chains have bowed to consumer pressure to better police their palm oil purchases. Environmentalists say it's a win for consumers, trees and animals.

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Killing Comes Naturally To Chimps, Scientists Say

September 18, 2014 - 12:22pm

A new study bolsters the theory that chimpanzees kill rivals as an adaptation to their natural environment and not as a result of human impact.

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From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

September 18, 2014 - 5:06am

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.

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Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And Raise The Risk Of Diabetes

September 17, 2014 - 4:47pm

There's a new wrinkle to the old debate over diet soda: Artificial sweeteners may alter our microbiomes. And for some, this may raise blood sugar levels and set the stage for diabetes.

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Europe's Family Tree Gets A New Branch

September 17, 2014 - 4:47pm

Genetic evidence from ancient humans and modern people suggests that travelers from northern Eurasia moved south several thousand years ago. They stuck around to have kids with early European farmers.

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Multispectral Imaging Could Reveal Secrets Of Martellus Map

September 17, 2014 - 4:08pm

A team of researchers are using multispectral imaging to uncover hidden text on a 1491 Martellus map, one of the most important maps in history. Lead researcher Chet Van Duzer thinks the discoveries will allow historians and scholars to see just how the map influenced cartography in its time.

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Study Of 'Flexible Brains' May Aid Injury Understanding

September 17, 2014 - 4:08pm

Physicist Danielle Bassett has been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship based on her work studying the human brain. She talks with Melissa Block about the advances it may lead to.

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Colorado Tries Hard To Convince Teens That Pot Is Bad For You

September 17, 2014 - 1:01pm

Do you want to be a lab rat? That's what teenagers are doing when they smoke marijuana, the state of Colorado says. But since hard evidence of marijuana's harms is scanty, it may be a tough sell.

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Top Scientists Suggest A Few Fixes For Medical Funding Crisis

September 17, 2014 - 4:11am

The answer, this time, isn't simply more cash, says Dr. Harold Varmus, director of the National Cancer Institute. Instead, changing the way research money is distributed might fix systemic problems.

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Meet The 2014 Winners Of The MacArthur 'Genius Grants'

September 17, 2014 - 12:07am

This year's winners include a cartoonist, a documentarian, a leader in the legal fight for gay marriage, a saxophonist, mathematicians and scientists, poets, lawyers and advocates.

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Boeing And SpaceX Win $6.8 Billion In NASA Contracts

September 16, 2014 - 5:52pm

By 2017, the two American companies are expected to take over a job that NASA has relied upon Russia to perform: shuttling astronauts to the International Space Station.

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U.S. To Send 3,000 Troops To West Africa To Aid In Ebola Epidemic

September 16, 2014 - 4:19pm

On Tuesday, President Obama announced that the U.S. will send more military personnel and resources to Africa to fight the deadly virus.

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Breast Cancer Patients Seek More Control Over Research Agenda

September 16, 2014 - 4:11pm

Tired of waiting for a cure for breast cancer, a coalition of activists now leans hard on Congress to steer money to particular research projects. Critics say that approach may miss promising leads.

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Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists

September 16, 2014 - 3:38am

So, you want to be a science professor? Good luck. Highly educated, relatively low-paid postdoctoral fellows may drive U.S. biomedical research, but they're training for jobs that don't exist.

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